Immersion System

Immersion System

Introduction

Providing an immersive experience for live sporting events requires a coordinated crew of camera operators, directors, and technical personnel to control and switch between multiple cameras [1], [2]. For popular team sports (e.g., professional football, basketball, or hockey), a large broadcast crew coordinates multiple cameras so that the broadcast can follow the fast-paced action on the field.  The directional crew aims to maximize the end-user experience by providing immersive content through storytelling. These systems required a large crew of coordinated people in the stream production process.

The cost and the logistical complexity preclude professional multi-camera setups for smaller events, typically webcast by a novice operator controlling a single camera. There are a few limitations that prevent these systems from being widely adopted while maximizing the end-user experience. The cost and logistical complexity preclude these professional multi-camera setups for small events, which is why they are typically webcast by a novice operator controlling a single camera. In addition, the final user has almost no control over the perspective view; its experience is mostly dictated by the narrative of the production team. This project aims to provide a system that allows a user to watch live events from the actors’ perspective on the scene while minimizing the production load of traditional systems by reducing the size of the management team to nearly a user.